Author Archives: fnsnews

Feminicides, Insecurity Unhinge Cancun

“We are all Karen.” Those words formed part of the rallying cry of residents of Cancun who took to the streets on Sunday, November 1. Organized by students from the University of the Caribbean, a crowd estimated at several thousand people staged a silent march through Mexico’s leading tourist destination to protest last week’s brutal…
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Behind Ciudad Juarez’s New Labor Movement

  In a virtually unprecedented development, labor protest is widening in the maquiladora industry of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. While worker dissatisfaction or protest is nothing new in the foreign-owned border factories that produce goods for export to the United States, previous manifestations of discontent in the generally union-free industry have usually been confined to one…
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Toxic Mine Waste Spill Litigation Piles Up

Litigation stemming from a spill last year of toxic mine waste in the northern Mexican border state of Sonora is growing. Last week, prominent Sonora environmentalist Rosa Maria O’Leary filed a legal complaint against Buenavista del Cobre, operators of the copper mine located near the Mexico-U.S. border, as well as an assortment of state and…
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The Occupation of the Bridge of the Americas

The Bridge of the Americas, also known as the Cordoba Bridge or Free Bridge in borderland parlance, carries more than just commercial trucks and routine travelers between the northern Mexican city of Ciudad Juarez and El Paso, Texas. Over the years the border crossing over the Rio Grande has also served as a bridge between…
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The Long and Winding Road of Jaguar Conservation

In twists and turns, efforts are mounting to protect the Americas’ biggest wild cat. A Mexican initiative, the National Alliance for Jaguar Conservation, unites non-governmental and governmental organizations in a new and “ambitious” program aimed at saving an emblematic creature, says Dr. Gerardo Ceballos, Alliance member and coordinator of the National Autonomous University of Mexico’s…
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Indigenous Community Police Look Back, Look Forward

Twenty years ago, a revolution in policing and community justice broke out in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero.  Fed up with constant robberies and sexual assaults, Indigenous communities in the Costa Rica and La Montana regions of Guerrero formed armed community police forces that grew into the Regional Coordinator of Community Authorities (CRAC). Taking…
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Soccer: Common Ground Trouncing Borders

Editor’s Note: Immigration is transforming the United States in countless ways. Sports is one social arena where the influence of immigrants is making a change in society. In today’s story, New Mexico State University graduate student Nicolás Cabrera takes us to one recent event in New Mexico that illustrated how fútbol, or soccer, is sowing…
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Mexican Foxconn Workers Stage Hunger Strike

Employees of Foxconn’s Scientific Atlanta plant in Ciudad Juarez escalated a protest this week for better wages and dignified treatment. Setting up camp underneath a tent, worker Carlos Octavio Serrano initiated a hunger strike in front of the factory located in the Intermex Industrial Park. Twenty one other workers said they would join Serrano in…
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Welcome to Indigenous Peoples Day, Burque Style

The people came from many patches of Turtle Island. There were Comanches, Apaches, Pueblo, Dine (Navajo), and members of many more nations.  Hundreds strong the people marched, some attired in traditional dress and pounding drums.  As the sounds of flute rose above the din of early evening traffic, the crowd surged through downtown Albuquerque and…
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The Movement to Change October 12th Holiday Rooted In History

Editor’s Note:  As part of our special coverage marking the historic transformation of Columbus Day into Indigenous Peoples Day, we offer this contribution by Nicolás Cabrera.  He is a graduate student who specializes in Spanish literature at NMSU. Cabrera’s piece discusses Latin American manifestations of the movement, as well as historical accounts of the early…
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