Category Archives: New Mexico History

The Racist Seal Controversy: What do the UNM Kiva Club and the Red Nation Want?

A movement initiated by the Kiva Club, the chartered University of New Mexico Native American students’ organization, and The Red Nation, a Southwestern Native activist organization founded in 2014, has been getting a lot of attention in Albuquerque and New Mexico lately. Most of the media coverage has zoomed in on the groups’ demand that…
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The Movement to Change October 12th Holiday Rooted In History

Editor’s Note:  As part of our special coverage marking the historic transformation of Columbus Day into Indigenous Peoples Day, we offer this contribution by Nicolás Cabrera.  He is a graduate student who specializes in Spanish literature at NMSU. Cabrera’s piece discusses Latin American manifestations of the movement, as well as historical accounts of the early…
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Family History and DNA Link New Mexicans to Mexico, Part 2

This is the second article about family history and genetics that link New Mexicans and Mexico. Nicolás Cabrera, a graduate student studying Spanish, filed this report as part of our series written by NMSU students. Through the centuries, very good ecclesiastical and civil records have been kept and preserved in New Mexico that document the…
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El Cerro de Tomé: a Hill that Unites

Editor’s Note: As part of our ongoing series of articles written by NMSU students, Nicolás Cabrera, a graduate student studying Spanish literature, filed this report about a longstanding New Mexican tradition that takes place during Holy Week.   In the borderlands, Good Friday is one of the most important days of the year. People across…
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Family History and DNA Link New Mexicans to Mexico, Part 1

Editor’s Note: This is the first in an in-depth series about family history and genetic links between New Mexicans and Mexico. Nicolás Cabrera, a graduate student studying Spanish, worked on this piece as part of our continuing series of stories written by NMSU students.   It’s a typical Friday morning for Ernestino Tafoya as he…
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A New Window to Border Literary Culture

An incalculable casualty of border violence and security polices in recent years has been the cultural exchanges between Mexican and U.S. citizens. Yet as insecurity dominated the discourse about places like Ciudad Juarez and an existing cultural gap got even wider the border literary scene endured and even excelled amid the hard times. In the…
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New Mexico’s Next Century

Editor’s note: Today’s essay concludes Frontera NorteSur’s  current series on New Mexico history since 1912. Since 2008, FNS has posted original articles and radio documentaries on different facets of state history and culture, especially as they relate to southern New Mexico.  Interested readers can find the pieces on the FNS website under the Centennial section…
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Were New Mexico Border Counties Short-changed?

Editor’s note: Nearing the end of our series on the New Mexico Centennial of Statehood,  Frontera NorteSur takes a look today at federal stimulus spending in the southern New Mexico border region following  the economic crisis of 2008.  Our special coverage of the southern New Mexico borderland is made possible in part by a grant…
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The Black Berets Live On

A little more than a half-century after conquered New Mexico became a U.S. state, resistance and rebellion percolated throughout the land. Dispossessed of their land base, thousands of people joined the Alianza Federal de las Mercedes, an organization of  Spanish and Mexican land grant heirs led by Reies Lopez Tijerina, demanding the return of their…
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A Harvest Of Festivals

Every fall, New Mexicans celebrate the harvest and the changing of seasons. Festivals, fairs, farmer’s markets and more splash the land. Come and explore the deep history of New Mexico harvest festival time through an audio journey to Dona Ana County celebrations and up into the Hatch Valley, home of the state’s famous chile crop….
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