Category Archives: Commerce, Labor & Economics

Commerce, Labor & Economics

Juarez Valley Strives for Recovery

Travelers headed south of Elephant Butte Reservoir in New Mexico might have noticed a full, flowing Rio Grande in recent days. The coveted water was on its way to Mexico where, under a binational 1906 treaty, the U.S. is annually obligated to deliver 74 million cubic meters of the liquid. Once past the border, the…
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Pay Rumble at Border Big Rig Plant

Labor unrest broke out at a truck manufacturing plant in Mexicali, Baja California, this month. Dissatisfied over a profit-sharing payment as well as stagnating wages,¬† some employees of the Kenworth Mexicana assembly plant staged a work stoppage on Friday, May 9.¬† Employees again halted production on Monday, May 12, after news spread of co-workers sacked…
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The Fight Deepens on May Day 2014

Nationally and internationally, May Day 2014 linked the immigrant and labor movements with an expansive agenda for change. In one such initiative that was organized in more than 50 cities worldwide, Global Climate Convergence events that began on Earth Day culminated in May 1 actions that tied together labor and immigrant rights with demands for…
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Mexican Economy Falters

Only a few months ago, the Mexican economy was portrayed in the international press as poised for take-off as the next emerging global powerhouse. Stories appeared of a vibrant middle class primed to join the free-spending club of consumers. But as the spring of 2014 progresses, Mexico‚Äôs economy is stumbling. Dampening projections of high growth,…
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A New Gas Pipeline for Texas-Tamaulipas

The U.S.¬† Federal Energy Regulatory¬† Commission (FERC) has approved a presidential permit for the construction of a new cross-border natural gas pipeline.¬† Granted last week to Houston Pipeline Co.,¬† the new line is intended for the export of shale gas from Hidalgo County, Texas, to the Mexican border city of Reynosa, Tamaulipas. According to the…
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Lime, Gangsters and the Yellow Dragon

The tangy lime is essential to Mexican cuisine. An ingredient of flavored water, the fruit is also squeezed into soups, dabbed on fish, sprinkled on tacos al pastor and utilized in countless other recipes. A cold Corona or Tecate, or a shot of tequila,¬† without a dash of lime is almost like a root beer…
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The New Free Trade Fever

20 years after the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) went into effect, little interest has been shown until now by the governments of the signatory countries for reopening the trade pact. But a similar agreement between Mexico and the European Union, signed in 1997 and enacted in 2000, is under review and could be…
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Border Businesses Eligible for Disaster Loans

Certain, small non-agricultural enterprises in the Paso del Norte borderland are now eligible for U.S. Small Business Administration loans because of the drought extending across the region. In an announcement, the SBA included the New Mexico county of Dona Ana and the Texas counties of El Paso and Hudspeth among the entities eligible for long-term,…
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Insecurity: The Achilles Heel of Mexican Reforms?

The security crisis in the Mexican state of Michoacan is smacking the economy, bringing higher costs,¬† leaving shuttered businesses, encouraging capital flight, and causing¬† employment reductions,¬† according to different reports. For instance, the Mexican Social Security Institute¬† reported that the violence-ridden state, where crime syndicates, self-defense groups and government security forces are in a stand-off,¬†…
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Black Friday: The Perfect NAFTA Holiday?

If the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) were to have its own holiday, it might very well be Black Friday Week. Mimicking their counterparts in the U.S., Mexican merchants this month rolled out a version of the U.S. shopping frenzy for the third year in a row, while more and more Canadians planned to…
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